Mast producing trees

Will, the power of mast producing trees as a supplemental food and for their deer-holding ability are often underestimated by property managers. Trees take work to establish and will not have the quick payout of annual food plots, but the amount of food they produce for the amount of input is well worth it, for you and the deer on your property. As for nut producing mast trees, it’s hard to go wrong with the durability of oaks, especially bur oak. I would also look at Sawtooth oak. These trees are not native, but they are fast growing and start producing good acorn crops within about 5 years! Best of all, they are not a threat to the habitat, will not take over your property. They are rather short-lived at about 20 years, but if you plant them in combination with other nut species then you can let the others mature while Sawtooth drop acorns everywhere.

By autumn the acorns have ripened and, before the leaves of the tree are shed, they fall to the ground. However some types of oak trees produce acorns at a different rate than others. White oaks, for example, need only one growing season from the time of pollination to the acorn ripening. In contrast, red oaks need two growing seasons. Once the acorns fall to the ground, the subsequent shedding of the tree's leaves acts as a deterrent to acorn-eating animals and birds by covering and hiding the acorns on the forest floor. Of course this only serves to reduce the amount of acorns scavenged by the creatures, and only a small proportion the seeds will remain intact and go on to mature into adult oak trees. However, animals that do get their claws and paws on the acorns do not necessarily have an entirely negative impact on the success of the oak tree population. A study by scientists at the North American universities of Wilkes and Richmond, as quoted in an article on the website of the research industry publication Science Daily, claims that gray squirrels are an aid to the regeneration and dispersal of oaks, as they rarely eat all the acorns they scavenge and hide away, meaning some of these acorns survive and grow into oak trees.

For this reason, and the fact that you don’t want to hunt too frequently around just one tree and cause the deer feeding there to become nocturnal, it’s a good idea to have several trees in a variety of settings to fertilize. At present I am working with six trees — three are in a bottomland setting and three are on a mountaintop setting. If a late frost gets some of them, there’s a chance that the others won’t be damaged. In good seed-producing years I have six good places to hunt without putting too much pressure on any one location.

If one has Lyme – it is likely one has not been detoxing mercury well, and so starting at very low levels of zinc supplemetation is advised, like 15 to 30 mg only a few days a week to start, and building up. This is mostly to avoid detoxing mercury too fast. A binder needs to be used as well – like charcoal, clay, chlorella. blue green algae, etc. to avoid bouncing mercury through out the body. Some practitioners, such as Dr Klinghardt are saying with Lyme strive for zinc / copper balance and thus advise taking small amounts of copper with zinc to assist. However Dr Walsh seems to advise to supplement zinc well and high enough levels, especially where HPU (Pyrrole) is involved, which also is often the case with infection.

After the pigs have done their conversion, the cattle and chickens enter the silvopasture areas. Cattle graze about 12 to 15 acres of silvopasture in a pattern similar to their open-pasture rotations, grazing half of the grass in a one- or two-acre paddock and then moving on after one or two days. Rest periods are 30 to 50 days, with cattle rotated through most paddocks three or four times a year. Cattle often graze young, developing silvopasture more intermittently. And of course the trees offer summer shade and winter housing. Chickens are also rotated through the silvopasture areas.

Mast producing trees

mast producing trees

If one has Lyme – it is likely one has not been detoxing mercury well, and so starting at very low levels of zinc supplemetation is advised, like 15 to 30 mg only a few days a week to start, and building up. This is mostly to avoid detoxing mercury too fast. A binder needs to be used as well – like charcoal, clay, chlorella. blue green algae, etc. to avoid bouncing mercury through out the body. Some practitioners, such as Dr Klinghardt are saying with Lyme strive for zinc / copper balance and thus advise taking small amounts of copper with zinc to assist. However Dr Walsh seems to advise to supplement zinc well and high enough levels, especially where HPU (Pyrrole) is involved, which also is often the case with infection.

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